WEBCAM SHIELD FOR MACBOOKS

THE THREAT IS REAL

SpiShutter is an easy, discrete way to ensure your privacy by shielding your Macbook’s webcam against unwanted eyes. You should never have to worry about your personal devices betraying your privacy, but the truth is that there is currently a rise in the threat of webcam hacking. SpiShutter was invented to address these webcam hacking concerns, as well as to prevent awkward moments when your webcam is accidentally enabled an online call. As an example, in August 2013, Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf revealed that she was the victim of a webcam hack and sextortion in which someone took pictures of her, supposedly nude, in her room and used them for blackmail. To learn more click on the ink below. 

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Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf came on TODAY Thursday to talk about a cybercrime that she said occurred months before she was crowned. Wolf said she was a victim of "sextortion", in which perpetrators demand sexual favors to prevent them from releasing intimate photos or videos online that are often obtained through hacking into computers, webcams and smartphone cameras. Four months before Wolf won the title, she said a stranger hacked into her computer webcam without her knowing it and took nude photos of her in her bedroom. He tried to extort her by saying she would have to "perform" for him or he'd the nude photos online.

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Webcams should be covered when not in use because hackers could be using them to spy on people, a charity advises. Childnet International says webcams should be disconnected when not in use, and teenagers should not leave webcams in bedrooms or other private areas. A BBC Radio 5 live investigation found sites where hackers exchanged pictures and videos of people captured on their own webcams without their knowledge. A police spokeswoman said webcam hackers would be prosecuted. Commons Home Affairs Committee chairman Keith Vaz urged teachers to talk to pupils about the dangers of using webcams, and computer manufacturers to improve security for users. 

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You know those people who put tape over their laptop’s webcam to keep digital peeping toms at bay? They’re not crazy. A new proof of concept is making the rounds today that demonstrates how a hacker can snap pics off your webcam, right through the browser, with no consent required. Well, technically, you are giving consent. You just wouldn’t know it. Outlined by security consultant Egor Homakov, the hack brings in a few old tricks to work around Flash’s requirement that a user explicitly grants a website permission before it can access their camera or microphone.

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The woman was shocked when she received two nude photos of herself by e-mail. The photos had been taken over a period of several months — without her knowledge — by the built-in camera on her laptop. Fortunately, the FBI was able to identify a suspect: her high school classmate, a man named Jared Abrahams. The FBI says it found software on Abrahams’s computer that allowed him to spy remotely on her and numerous other women. Abrahams pleaded guilty to extortion in October. The woman, identified in court papers only as C.W., later identified herself on Twitter as Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf. While her case was instant fodder for celebrity gossip sites, it left a serious issue unresolved.

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Many users of the internet think that by not replying to 'phishing scams' - false invitations encouraging you to hand over personal information - they are safe online. But hackers use increasingly sophisticated techniques to trick more savvy web users, and gain control of their computers. The BBC's LJ Rich visited the Swedish security firm Sentor in Stockholm, who carry out professional 'penetration tests' for companies to see how strong their cyber defences are. Analyst Bjorn Johansson demonstrated to her how internet users can give hackers control of their computer, including the webcam, just by visiting a vulnerable web page with an internet browser. 

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One of the year’s biggest stories was the revelation of widespread surveillance by the government. We learned about the NSA’s efforts to weaken cryptography standards, eavesdrop on electronic communications and gather billions of cell phone records. Then came news that what seemed like an urban legend is actually true: the FBI can remotely activate a computer’s digital camera to spy on the user—without turning on the light that indicates the camera is live. That news comes courtesy of court documents unearthed by The Washington Post. The FBI says they use this not-at-all-hidden camera trick to find transient terrorists. The use of webcams for spying comes as no shock to anyone who followed the 2010 Philadelphia school case.

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